Ever thought about how you could do justice on camera to the beauty of the majestic sun? This article provides tips that will equip you with the skills you need in capturing romantic sunsets and inspiring sunrises. But first, keep in mind your safety – wear sunglasses to protect your eyes from looking directly at the sun while trying to capture the perfect photo!

1. Remove Filters

Photo by Harish Segar
Canon EOS 5D Mark IV | Canon EF100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS II USM | Canon Extender EF 1.4xIII | F/7.1 | ISO 100 | 1/30s

When shooting straight at a light source take extra attention to your gear, especially your lens. Filters act as an obstacle to light passing through the lens, and may cause the light to bounce off the front of your lens. When this happens, you would end up with a ghost image of the sun. Remove any physical filters and clean your lens to prevent interference in capturing the sun clearly.

2. Setting the Mood

Photo by Harish Segar
Canon EOS 5D Mark IV | Canon EF100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS II USM | Canon Extender EF 1.4xIII | F/7.1 | ISO 2000 | 1/80s

Sunsets and sunrises can evoke different moods be it a romantic sunset, nostalgic sky or even a raging sun. Capturing the right temperature is essential in portraying the mood through your photograph. If you’re wondering how to warm up your photograph, the answer to that is to change your White Balance function from “auto” to “cloudy”.

Photo by Ngee Chye Teo
Canon EOS 5D Mark III | Canon EF70-300mm f/4-5.6 IS II USM |  F/8 | ISO 500 | 1/100s

However, if you are going for that blue and gloomy mood in your sunrise photography, do not change the White Balance function from “auto”.

3. Photo Quality in Low Light

 

Photo by Ngee Chye Teo
Canon EOS 5D Mark II | F/8 | ISO 100 | 1/100s

When capturing low light photographs, always use a tripod to prevent blurring during long exposures. When you compose your picture try to experiment with different placings of your subject. For example, when photographing the sun you could follow the rule of thirds and place your subject away from the center. Tip: you can use the grid lines and place your subject anywhere the grid lines intersect!

Photo by Harish Segar
Canon EOS 5D Mark IV | Canon EF100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS II USM | Canon Extender EF 1.4xIII |  F/8 | ISO 1000 | 1/320s

Photos of direct light sources can be tricky but we’ve got more tips for you! Remember to decrease the ISO to 100 or 200 to minimise noise in the photo and only use 800 when necessary. Landscape photographs hold a wide range of details in one frame so maximise the depth of field by setting a high aperture to get a sharp image. This being said, do not fear experimenting with the different aperture and shutter speed settings – you might just be rewarded with different amazing shots!

Photo by Harish Segar
Canon EOS 5D Mark IV | Canon EF16-35mm f/4L IS USM |  F/8 | ISO 1000 | 1/320s

The golden time frame for shooting sunsets and sunrises is an estimation of 30 minutes after the setting or rising of the sun. Keep shooting within this time frame and be rewarded with an array of brilliant images. Now go forth, take this advice and start experimenting with the exposure, aperture and shutter speed of your camera! Just be sure to head to your location earlier to scout for good photo opportunities and have a sense of the lighting situation.